Shakyamuni Buddha

‘Shakyamuni Buddha’: literally translates to 'Sage of the Shakyas' & name used to refer to Gautama Buddha, a Prince born in North East India around 563 BC. He sought the truth through several years of ascetic practice (such as fasting and long hours of meditation).The Buddha reached enlightenment after a committed period of meditation underneath a bodhi tree, in Bodhgaya, India. From then on he was called 'the Awakened One' and he travelled India, sharing…

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Green Tara Mantra

A Tibetan Buddhist depiction of Green Tara Tara is the goddess of compassion. From the Sanskrit root 'tr'; 'Tara' means to 'take across', referring to Tara's role in helping us to traverse through samsara ('world of illusion'). Her mantra: 'Om tare tuttare ture svāhā', is one of the most well known mantras in the tantric tradition (there are over 72 million!). Mantras are sacred words with spiritual potency and are generally used to transport the…

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Impermanence – A Gateway to Liberation

The worlds longest stretch of prayer wheels. The inner kora at Labrang Monastery, Xiahe, China. Anitya or impermanence is a very powerful and profound teaching of the Buddha. We can define Anitya as;  ‘...the constant, basic universal truth of change. Impermanence is both a process of continual loss, in which things exist and then disappear, and it is also a process of continuous rebirth or creativity, in which things that do not exist suddenly appear.’…

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‘Self-realisation’- What is it?

Many of us have heard of the term but might be a bit confused as to what it actually means. A potential reason for confusion is that ‘self-realisation’ has very different meanings, depending on whether you are coming to the term from a common Western understanding or from an Oriental/Eastern understanding.The Western definition has been influenced by Western psychoanalysis. The Oxford Learner’s Dictionary defines ‘self-realisation’ as ‘the fact of using your skills and abilities and…

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